Donation allows GBR Legacy to increase research time

GREAT BARRIER REEF

Victoria Stone-Meadows

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DONATED: Neno Padjen, head of Bauer Compressor Australia with John Rumney and Dean Miller of Great Barrier Reef Legacy. Image: Victoria Stone-Meadows.
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Port Douglas based research outfit, Great Barrier Reef Legacy, has been gifted thousands of dollars worth of diving equipment from Bauer Compressor Australia.

Bauer Compressor Australia has donated a portable air compressor that will allow GBR Legacy to refill SCUBA air tanks while they are out on the reef.

Neno Padjen, head of Bauer Compressor Australia, said the company is excited to help support research on the Great Barrier Reef.

“Bauer compressor is very proud to be part of such a wonderful endeavour to save coral reefs, not only the Great Barrier Reef but around the world,” he said.

“The donation of the equipment to GBR Legacy is to assist them to continue their research to save the reef for us and our children into the future.” 

Mr Padjen also said he hopes Bauer can continue to assist GBR Legacy into the future as well.

“I would like us to be close to them and ensure their needs are met in regards to diving and research so their work can continue and isn’t held back by any barriers we can help them with in any way.”

Great Barrier Reef Legacy’s Director of Science and Media, Dean Miller, said the donation is really exciting and will allow the team to expand their research operations.

“We are very excited to have an industry giant in Bauer Compressors, they are without a doubt the market leader in terms of high-pressure compressors that supply breathing air for SCUBA divers all around the world,” he said.

“To have such an intentional leader in business get behind GBR Legacy and sponsor every single research breath we are going to take to help save the reef is a real bonus for us.

Because Bauer has donated a mobile compressor, GBR Legacy will be able to refill their SCUBA air tanks on remote beaches, island, boats, and anywhere that they work along the reef.

“It also expands into new fields with citizen science that are not always at the same destination so being mobile is very important,” said John Rumney, Managing Director of GBR Legacy.

“It allows us to dive everywhere we go up and down the Great Barrier Reef,” Dr Miller said.

“It gives us huge flexibility and more research, more tanks, and more diving means more solutions for the Great Barrier Reef.”


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